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Reviewed by Ricardo Kerr

Into Orbit: Caverns

Reviewed by Ricardo Kerr

Into Orbit: Caverns

Wellington’s Into Orbit are an enigma. No matter what you think you know about them be prepared to forget every jot of it when you give this new album a spin. The term ‘post rock’ gets thrown around a lot these days but what Into Orbit have made here is completely beyond rock as we know it. Sure, Paul Stewart and Ian Moir start with those most basic of rock music building blocks – guitar and drums – but the end result of their tinkering is something else entirely.

This is pure head-space music, transporting you from your drab surroundings into the impossible cacophony of deep space. From the gorgeous notes that kick off Corridors to the squall of ecstatic feedback that closes out Creeping Vines, this album will have your attention. The highlight (and, for want of a better term, single) is Set Adrift. As the title suggests everything starts out beautiful and calm, Stewart’s reverberating chords rising to a hypnotic swell. It doesn’t take long for the pounding percussion to clue you in that something isn’t right. Across the song’s breadth you feel the unchained power of the cosmos dragging you out into the sky.

Just a few tracks later the lurking menace of Towers will see you hurtling back to Earth. ‘Caverns’ was recorded at Blue Room Studios in the band’s hometown by James Goldsmith and Mike Gibson. Most impressively ‘Caverns’ is the duo’s very first album, these two gents wring every last drop of drama out of their compositions. If this is a sign of things to come then Into Orbit have a very bright (and terrifying) future ahead of them.