nzm181

CURRENT ISSUE

DONATE ADVERTISE SUBSCRIBE

Reviewed by Colette Morrison

Daffodils: Stay The Night EP

Reviewed by Colette Morrison

Daffodils: Stay The Night EP

A few years on from their 2019 EP ‘Boys’, the latest release from indie darlings Daffodils is infectious, high-energy, and angsty enough to make any self-respecting indie aficionado proud.

The EP, titled ‘Stay The Night’, is a continuation of Daffodils’ partnership with co-producer Jol Mulholland, and sees a maturation of the band’s distinctive sound towards increasing complexity and experimentation.

There’s a lot to love about this EP, not least its length. Five tracks all-up and refreshingly fluff-free, the record is a cross-section through the Daffodils’ sound, each track revealing a different musical avenue that will hopefully be explored to greater ends in the band’s future work. The fuzzy guitars of Every Once In A While expand on Daffodils’ grungy, alternative influences, while Jade Bryham’s pulsing synth peppers the eponymous track Stay The Night full of retro references. Excluding the stand-alone single House Across The Street, ‘Stay The Night’ is the band’s first release post-pandemic, and is certainly oriented to make the most of re-emerging possibilities for live performance, with the songs offering ample opportunities for the Auckland foursome to experiment on stage.

This EP tracks all the less-than-glamorous emotional minefields of any given 20-something, but while the lyrics are rather solipsistic, their setting against Isaac Keating’s peppy drums situate the EP’s general sense of turmoil as more relatable and endearing than it might otherwise be. Something I’d Do closes out the listening experience with a weepy acoustic, offering a change of pace and an opportunity for frontman Theo Spike Salmon to demonstrate a new side of the band’s sound. Although the simplistic instrumentation at times leaves his vocals feeling exposed, the gentle harmonies which fill in the bridge introduce a sense of space that is rare across Daffodils’ output.

While there are certainly areas on the 22 minute-long EP where the band plays it safe, ‘Stay The Night’ is a step forward for Daffodils and reinforces their widely-hyped promise of a bright and interesting musical future.

Made with the support of NZ On Air Music.