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Reviewed by Stephen McTaggart

The Recliner Rockers: Tracks

Reviewed by Stephen McTaggart

The Recliner Rockers: Tracks

The Recliner Rockers’ debut album is that rare combination of clever songs, memorable hooks and excellent musicianship. An exciting and dynamic three-piece live, I was interested to hear how well their groove and feel would translate in the studio and wasn’t disappointed. ‘Tracks’ kicks off with the hard swinging jump blues of Betty Lou, showcasing the inventive and watertight rhythm section of Geoff Fitzpatrick on stand-up bass and Julian Davis on drums. Bruce French (a long time alumni and honorary fourth member of the band) adds sinewy and melodic saxophone lines to this and other tracks on the album. The albums’ composer and arranger, Alan Lavis, brings his distinct baritone voice, and (quite frankly) astonishing guitar playing to this and the other 11 tunes. One can hear the influences of American and English blues/rockabilly musicians Stevie Ray Vaughan, Peter Green, Scotty Moore and Hollywood Fats upon Lavis, and the rest of the band. That considered, The Recliner Rockers deliver a collection of original songs born from the NZ experience and of the emotional gamut through which many of us must daily pass. ‘Tracks’ is a soundtrack for big fun and dancing but also for pathos and heartbreak. Other stand out tracks include the gently rocking I Heard It On The Radio and the beautiful slow blues of Plane. Recorded at Montage Studios (which dates it to circa 2013) the self-released album was engineered by Kenny MacDonald. A fine momento of that night you cut loose, laughed and danced your feet off.